Dates:

Monday October 30, 2017
CREST_Logo1 (1)
bywardmarket

TSAS Workshop Series:
TSAS Presents ‘Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats’ (CREST) Researchers

TIME: 8:15 am -5 pm
LOCATION: Courtyard Marriott Ottawa Downtown,
350 Dalhousie Street, Ottawa, ON,
Canada K1N 7E9
Map of available parking near hotel

Event is open to TSAS Affiliates and Federal and Provincial and Municipal Government Employees.
LUNCH will be served.
Please RSVP by Oct 25th with Name, Title and Departmental or Institutional Affiliation to TSAS Project Manager: ec2ford@uwaterloo.ca

The workshop operates under the Chatham House Rule.
The Chatham House Rule reads as follows: When a meeting, or part thereof, is held under the Chatham House Rule, participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participant, may be revealed.
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Tentative Agenda: Joint TSAS/CREST Workshop For Abstracts and Bios scroll down.
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8:00 – 8:30 am Arrival and Registration (coffee and pastry)
8:30 – 9:00 am Welcome & Introduction to the Research Programs

Lorne Dawson, University of Waterloo, Director TSAS
Kim Knott, Lancaster University, Deputy Director CREST
Hilary Pilkington, University of Manchester, Principal
Investigator EU H2020 Dialogue on Radicalisation and Equality

In the following panels each presenter has 20 minutes, followed by one 20 minute Q & A period for all of the presentations.

9:00 – 10:40 am Panel 1- Conspiracies & Extremist Subcultures

1) Belief in Conspiracy Theories: Causes, Consequences and Communication
Dr. Karen Douglas, University of Kent

2) Spoofing, ‘Truthing’ and Social Proofing: Digital Influencing After Terrorism
Dr. Martin Innes, Cardiff University

3) Broadening our Understanding of Anti-Authority Movements in Canada
Dr. Ryan Scrivens, Concordia University

4) Beyond Ideological Diversity: A Typology of Canadian Far-right Movements
Dr. Aurelie Campana, Laval University

Discussion

10:40 – 10:50 am BREAK (10 mins) coffee and pastry

10:50 – 12:30 pm Panel 2 – Countering Extremism/Terrorism

5) How Teachers ‘Do Prevent’: CVE and Policy Enactment in Secondary Schools and Colleges
James Lewis, Lancaster University

6) The Enemy of my Enemy is my Friend: Informal Counter Messaging in the UK
Dr Benjamin Lee, Lancaster University

7) Tracking Transnational Terrorist Resourcing Nodes and Networks
Maseeh Haseeb and Pam Simpson (Principal Investigators: C. Leuprecht, A. Cockfield), Queen’s University

8) Staying Left of Bang: Lessons from the UK for Canada’s Approach to Anti-Terrorism Investigations
Craig Forcese, University of Ottawa

Discussion

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm LUNCH (45 mins) (buffet: soup, salad, sandwiches)

1:15 – 2:55 pm Panel 3- Foreign Fighters & Radicalization

9) Fighting in Foreign Lands: Narrative Identity and Political Imagination in Foreign Fighters’ Life Histories
Dr Sarah Marsden, Lancaster University

10) Telling Tales of Terrorism: How Kin and Peer Networks Shape Stories that Instigate Violence
Simon Copeland, Lancaster University

11) Becoming a Foreign Fighter: Key Insights from Fighters
Dr. Lorne Dawson (with A. Amarasinngam), University of Waterloo

12) A New Approach to Categorising Female Participation in Violent Extremism: The Importance of Group Conceptualisation and Individual Performance of a Role.
Rosamund Mutton, Lancaster University

Discussion

2:55 – 3:05 pm BREAK (10 mins) New Coffee and Pastry

3:05 – 4:30 pm Panel 4 – Radicalization in Different Contexts

13) Asylum Diasporas and Security: Is there a Threat Nexus Linked to Refugee Flows?
Dr. Christopher McDowell, City University of London

14) The Idea, Context, Framing and Realities of ‘Sikh Radicalisation’ in Britain
Dr. Jasjit Singh, University of Leeds

15) Risk, Resilience and Radicalization in the Canadian Somali Diaspora: A Comparative Analysis of Three Cities
Dr. Sara Thompson, Ryerson University

Discussion

4:30 – 4:45 pm Closing remarks

Abstracts and Bios in Order of Appearance:

ABSTRACTS:
1) Belief in conspiracy theories: Causes, consequences and communication

Professor Karen Douglas, University of Kent
Abstract:
In this talk, Karen Douglas will present an overview of a recent CREST-commissioned project on conspiracy theories. She will outline the social, political and personality factors that predict conspiracy belief and discuss why and how conspiracy theories are communicated. Finally, she will outline what we know so far about the consequences of conspiracy theories and will discuss some of the implications for security.
Bio:
Karen Douglas is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Kent. She studies the causes and consequences of belief in conspiracy theories.

2) Spoofing, ‘Truthing’ and Social Proofing: Digital Influencing After Terrorism
Prof Martin Innes, Cardiff University
Abstract:
Terrorist attacks function as ‘teachable moments’. Perpetrators commit their violence to teach their adversaries ‘a lesson’, whilst state authorities use them to learn about innovations in terrorist methodologies. In this paper, informed by social media data systematically collected following the four terrorist attacks in the UK in early 2017, we explore a third form of ‘teachable moment’ – using them to generate new insights and evidence about patterns of social reaction to terrorist attacks. The analysis identifies three major influencing strategies used on social media platforms to shape how an incident is defined and its public impacts. Spoofing involves deception and misleading audience members, whereas ‘truthing’ focuses upon mounting ‘truth-claims’. Social proofing is about creating an illusion of consensus and support for a position. It is argued that these communicative strategies, blended in different combinations, explain a lot of the online influencing behaviour that takes place in the aftermath of major terrorist attacks.
Bio:
Professor Martin Innes is Director of the Crime and Security Research Institute and Universities’ Police Science Institute at Cardiff University. His current research involves collaborations with UK police Counter-Terrorism Command and a number of police forces.

3) Broadening our Understanding of Anti-Authority Movements in Canada
Dr. Ryan Scrivens, Concordia University
Abstract:
Academic explorations of anti-authority movements are virtually non-existent in Canada. In the absence of any academic assessment of these movements, we embarked on a one-year pilot project, bringing an exploratory and multi-method approach to this first such study, grounded in interviews with law enforcement, lawyers, judges, notaries, and movement adherents (n = 32), along with analysis of open source data which included media reports, court documents, and movement websites. Here we identified a number of distinct variants of anti-authority adherents in Canada, as well as highlighted the distribution of the Canadian movement, the many diverse and frequently contradictory arms of it, and associated classes of violence. We also identified emerging areas that cause some concern and that are worthy of close monitoring, and concluded with a set of recommendations.
Bio:
Ryan Scrivens is a Horizon Postdoctoral Fellow at Concordia University, working with Project SOMEONE to build resilience against hatred and radicalization leading to violent extremism, both on- and offline. Ryan is also a Research Associate at the International CyberCrime Research Centre at Simon Fraser University, a Visiting Researcher at the VOX-Pol Network of Excellence, and the Associate Theses Research Editor of Perspectives on Terrorism. His primary research interests include: right-wing extremism, hate/bias crime, countering violent extremism, and research methods and methodology. Ryan’s research appears in, amongst others, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression, and the Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice. He has also presented his findings before the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Swedish Defence Research Agency, and the Centre of Excellence for National Security in Singapore.

4) Beyond Ideological Diversity: A Typology of Canadian Far-right Movements
Abstract:
This presentation analyzes the recent reconfigurations of the Canadian far-right scene. It proposes a new typology based on the strategies of legitimation the most active groups within this galaxy use. This typology distinguishes three types of groups: the clandestine potentially violent groups; the nostalgic and nativist reformists, and the far-right groups located at the margins of the political field that have been since at least two years attracting more and more visibility across the country. The presentation also discusses the differences between provinces and shows that although most of these groups adopt anti-Muslim and anti-immigrants discourses, they are first challenging the governing elites and the state.
Bio:
Aurélie Campana is Professor of Political Science at Laval University. She is also associate director of the Canadian Research Network on Terrorism, Security and Society (TSAS) and member of the Centre International de Criminologie Comparée (U. of Montreal). Her research has focused for years on terrorism in internal conflicts, the diffusion of violence across movements and borders and discourses on terrorism and counterterrorism. She is also working, in collaboration with Samuel Tanner and Stéphane Leman-Langlois, on far-right extremism in Canada. Her research appeared in numerous journals, including Civil Wars, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Terrorism and Political Violence, Critical Studies on Terrorism and Mediterranean Politics.

5) How Teachers ‘Do Prevent’: CVE and Policy Enactment in Secondary Schools and Colleges
James Lewis, Lancaster University
Abstract:
The ‘Prevent Duty’ introduced by the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 placed schools and colleges in England under a statutory duty to have ‘due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism’. My research investigates how teachers are practically responding to this legislation. I argue that educational approaches to CVE should be rooted in educational expertise. Identifying two distinct literatures on Prevent, the analysis of discourse and practice, I suggest that an integrated analysis is essential for explaining the practice of Prevent in schools.
Bio:
James Lewis is an ESRC-funded PhD Candidate in International Relations at Lancaster University, and a CREST Associate. His research focuses on the UK’s Prevent strategy and the enactment of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 in secondary schools and colleges in England. He holds an MLitt in Terrorism Studies and an MA (Hons) in International Relations, both awarded by the University of St Andrews.

6) The Enemy of my Enemy is my Friend: Informal Counter Messaging in the UK
Dr Benjamin Lee, Lancaster University
Abstract:
Described variously as counter speech, counter messages, counter narratives, and alternative messages, counter terror and counter extremist organisations, including governments, have sought to debunk extremist messages. These attempts have been criticised as preachy and lacking credibility among target audiences. Even where these groups have sought to tap existing grassroots activists, messages are tainted by allegations of co-option: ‘scholars for dollars’. Despite this, challenging extremist messages is something that societies have done quite well. Those on the extremes are, by definition, out of step with their peers. Most recently, social media has become a vast repository of informally produced content that challenges the messages produced by extremists of all types. What’s more, there’s good reason to think that it may be more authentic and edgier than establishment attempts. Based on a limited pilot study of interviews, this paper attempts to understand the experiences of informal creators, evaluate their motivations, and begin to assess their opinions on suggestions of closer working with formal organisations.
Bio:
Dr Ben Lee is a Senior Research Associate at the Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats, and is based at Lancaster University, UK. In addition to work on ideological transmission, his research interests include web-based campaigning, terrorism, political extremism and counter extremism. He co-edits the blog Radicalisation Research.

7) Tracking Transnational Terrorist Resourcing Nodes and Networks
Maseeh Haseeb and Pam Simpson (Principal Investigators: C. Leuprecht, A. Cockfield), Queen’s University
Abstract: How are terrorists and their networks financed? Who raises the financial resources and how do they transfer them across borders? How does the global financial industry facilitate or impede these transfers? Answers to these and other questions can help law enforcement investigate, disrupt and ultimately shut down cross-border terrorist financing. The problem is that evidence and data on this phenomenon is scarce, of questionable quality, ir-replicable and/or difficult to come by. This study is the first comprehensive effort to collect, code, compare, and analyze open-source data on transnational terrorist financing networks. It thus contributes to the ongoing optimization of anti-terrorist resourcing laws, policies, and risk-management practices.
Bio: Maseeh Haseeb is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Law at Queen’s University. His research interests are national security law and surveillance. In addition, he is a research assistant at the Royal Military College of Canada, where his research focuses on cross-border financing of terrorism.

8)Staying Left of Bang: Lessons from the UK for Canada’s Approach to Anti-Terrorism Investigations
Craig Forcese, University of Ottawa
Abstract:
Bio:
Craig Forcese is a full professor at the Faculty of Law (Common Law Section), University of Ottawa.
He is also an Adjunct Research Professor & Senior Fellow, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University (from 2017 to 2022); a National Security Crisis Law Fellow, Center on National Security and the Law at Georgetown Law (Washington DC) (from 2017 to 2020); and, Senior Associate at the Global Justice Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto (2016 to 2018).
Craig sits on the executive on the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society (TSAS), and is a past president of the Canadian Council on International Law and the Canadian Association of Law Teachers.
At uOttawa, Craig teaches public international law, national security law, administrative law and constitutional law. He also co-teaches advanced international law and relations at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University. He co-organizes and instructs the Canadian component of Georgetown Law’s National Security Crisis Law course and simulation. He is a member in good standing of the bars of Ontario, New York and the District of Columbia.
Much of Craig’s present research and writing relates to national security and democratic accountability. In the national security area, he is co-author of False Security: The Radicalization of Canada’s Terror Laws (Irwin Law, 2015) (with Kent Roach), the author of National Security Law: Canadian Practice in International Perspective (Irwin Law, 2008) and co-editor of Human Rights and Anti-terrorism (Irwin Law, 2008) and Terrorism, Law and Democracy: 10 Years after 9/11 (Montreal: Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice, 2012). Craig blogs regularly on national security law at www.nationalsecuritylaw.ca.

9) Fighting in Foreign Lands: Narrative Identity and Political Imagination in Foreign Fighters’ Life Histories
Dr Sarah Marsden, Lancaster University
Abstract:
Drawing on life history interviews with a small number of former foreign fighters, this paper offers a rich, qualitative account of how involvement, disengagement, and reintegration are subjectively experienced and recalled. The accounts of narrative identity are interpreted in the context of wider collective political, religious, and ideological narratives, and in relation to the political imagination reflected in their life histories. In exploring these issues with a focus on individual processes of sense-making, the paper examines what informs post-conflict trajectories and biographical outcomes associated with involvement in jihad.
Bio:
Dr Sarah Marsden is Lecturer in Radicalisation and Protest in a Digital Age in the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University, prior to which she was a Lecturer in Terrorism Studies at the University of St Andrews. Much of her recent work has concentrated on understanding efforts to reintegrate those with a history of militancy, research which has recently been brought together in a book: Reintegrating Extremists: Deradicalisation and Desistance (Palgrave McMillan, 2017).

10) Telling Tales of Terrorism: How Kin and Peer Networks Shape Stories that Instigate Violence
Simon Copeland, Lancaster University
Abstract:
Kin and peer networks play an important role in the recruitment of terrorist groups. Many studies, however, fail to address the role of these relationships in shaping stories that instigate harm, including those that mobilise individuals to engage in political violence. Applying approaches from narrative criminology to terrorists’ autobiographies, kin and peer narratives commonly appear to transmit values, beliefs and rationales that make engagement in terrorism an appealing or somehow necessary proposition. In particular, case studies can highlight the processes by which the stories that circulate within these networks can attach transcendent, emotional energy to certain behaviours and elevate and mythologise individuals as role models to emulate. A better understanding of such processes may help explain the allure of contemporary terrorist groups.
Bio:
Simon Copeland is a doctoral researcher at Lancaster University funded by the Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats (CREST). His research focuses on what terrorists’ own accounts reveal about the role and influence of kin and peer networks in the transmission of extremist ideologies and the move to involvement in political violence.

11) Becoming a Foreign Fighter: Key Insights from Fighters
Dr. Lorne Dawson (with A. Amarasinngam), University of Waterloo
Abstract:
Bio:
Dr. Lorne Dawson is a Full Professor in the Department of Sociology and Legal Studies and the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Waterloo. He has written three books, edited four books, and published sixty five academic articles and book chapters. Most of his research had been in the sociology of religion, particularly the study of new religious movements, and such phenomena as charismatic authority, apocalyptic movements, and the failure of prophecy. His work on why some new religions become violent led to research on the process of radicalization in homegrown terrorist groups, and terrorism more generally. In 2012 he helped to found, and is currently the Director of the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society (www.tsas.ca). One of his current projects is a qualitative study of foreign fighters in Syria and Iraq, and the family members and friends of such fighters (e.g., L. Dawson and A. Amarsingam, “Talking to Foreign Fighters: Insights into the Motivations for Hijrah to Syria and Iraq,” Studies in Conflict and Terrorism 40 (3), 2017: 191-210 DOI 10.1080/1057610X.2016.1274216). He has made numerous invited presentations on the radicalization of terrorists to academic and government groups, and he is frequently interviewed in the media about terrorism.

12) A New Approach to Categorising Female Participation in Violent Extremism: The Importance of Group Conceptualisation and Individual Performance of a Role.
Rosamund Mutton, Lancaster University
Abstract:
This paper argues that to better understand how women participate in violent extremism, it is necessary to reconsider the categorisation of roles women engage with. I propose a new approach which emphasises that roles – which under current frameworks are categorised as similar in type – vary qualitatively due to differences in the way they are conceptualised by the group and performed by the individual. These differences are influenced by a range of factors, such as the group’s context, its ideology, and the character and purpose of roles.
Bio:
Rosamund Mutton is a second-year PhD student, funded by CREST. Her research explores the various ways in which women participate in and engage with extremism, analysing the types of roles women perform. Her thesis explores why role performance differs across violent extremist groups. She completed both her undergraduate degree in Politics and International Relations, and her MA in Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies at Lancaster University. As a member of the Richardson Institute, she has undertaken various research internships, working with organisations including Radicalisation Research, Moonshot and the Institute for Strategic Dialogue.

13) Asylum Diasporas and Security: Is there a threat nexus linked to refugee flows?
Dr Christopher McDowell, City University of London
Abstract:
Recent US Presidential Executive Orders on “Foreign Terrorist Entry”, German Government and Europol reports on the “infiltration” of Europe-bound refugee movements, and UK media reports and court proceedings detailing the migration histories and refugees status of those arrested or convicted of terrorist offences have all drawn attention to a claimed threat nexus linked to refugee flows. This presentation examines that claim. It reviews the literature in an attempt to define “refugee politics”. Explores Sri Lankan Tamil diaspora politics from 1983 and considers whether it was a unique case (where the LTTE effectively controlled Tamil exile politics) or a model for diaspora politics emerging from other regions. And finally, the presentation seeks to identify whether, at different stages of the displacement/forced migration cycle, conditions are created that increase the risk of radicalisation or support for extreme politics among refugees and those seeking asylum.
Bio:
Dr Christopher McDowell is currently an Associate Dean for Global Engagement at City, University of London. He is a political anthropologist engaged in research on forced population displacement in the context of conflict and violence, development and environmental change. He has undertaken extended research in Sri Lanka, Ethiopia and Kyrgyzstan. He has recently completed commissioned research and advisory work for the Inspection Panel of The World Bank (Nepal and Uganda), the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (on development and displacement), and UNHCR (evaluating the UK Government’s Syrian refugee resettlement programme).

14) The idea, context, framing and realities of ‘Sikh radicalisation’ in Britain
Dr Jasjit Singh, University of Leeds

Abstract:
In the lead up to the November 2015 visit of the Indian Prime Minister to the UK, Indian media claimed that the India Prime Minister would be asking for strong action to be taken against British Sikh groups trying to revive the demand for a separate Sikh state, Khalistan (Yadav 2015). These reports claimed that a dossier would be presented naming gurdwaras where Sikh youths were being radicalized and being trained to make explosive devices. Alongside this, a number of incidents have taken place in Britain in recent years involving Sikhs, indicating for some, rising levels of ‘Sikh extremism’ and ‘Sikh fundamentalism’. Numerous protests against mixed faith weddings in gurdwaras, and against instances of ‘disrespect’ to the Guru Granth Sahib (R4G) have followed the protests against the Behzti (dishonour) play at the Rep Theatre in Birmingham in 2004. This paper examines these incidents and presents a model of Sikh activism in Britain based on ethnographic fieldwork and a literature review to examining the realities and framing of ‘Sikh radicalisation’ in Britain. What is meant by ‘Sikh radicalisation / fundamentalism’ in its various forms? Who or what are targets of this activity? What are the key Sikh activist narratives? What types of Sikh activism are present in Britain?
Bio:
Dr Jasjit Singh is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Leeds. His research examines religious identity and processes of religious and cultural transmission among South Asians in Britain. He is particularly interested in the relationship between traditional arenas of religious transmission such as the family environment and religious institutions and newer arenas of religious transmission often organised by young people including camps, University faith societies and the Internet.

15) Risk, Resilience and Radicalization in the Canadian Somali Diaspora: A Comparative Analysis of Three Cities
Dr. Sara Thompson, Ryerson University
Abstract:
Bio:
Dr. Sara K. Thompson is an Associate Professor at the Department of Criminology, Ryerson University, and Associate Director of the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society (TSAS). She has a PhD in Criminology from the University of Toronto, and her recent and ongoing research focuses on urban violence, push and pull factors associated with radicalization to violence, as well as the design, implementation and evaluation of violence prevention programs and policy. Since 2012, she has been involved as co-principal investigator in several major research projects funded by Public Safety Canada and Defence Research & Development Canada, and involving partner agencies that include the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Toronto Police Service, the Edmonton Police Service and the Calgary Police Service. Thompson has presented on her research at a range of domestic and international academic and practitioner conferences, and has briefed high level government and police officials on issues related to urban violence, terrorism, and policy and program evaluation.

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